© 2020 by Rebecca Nisetich. 

Rebecca Starr Nisetich: Curriculum Vitae

 

Education


Ph.D. in English, University of Connecticut, 2014
MA in English, with Honors, University of Massachusetts, 2007
BA in English, cum laude, Colby College, 2005

 

Professional and Teaching Experience
 

Assistant Professor, Honors Program, University of Southern Maine, 2018-current
Lecturer, Honors Program, University of Southern Maine, 2016-2018
Interim Director, Honors Program, University of Southern Maine, 2015-2016
Assistant Director, Honors Program, University of Southern Maine, 2014-2015

 

Research and Teaching Interests
 

Twentieth-century American literature, African American literature, Critical Race Theory, law and literature, humor studies, service learning, composition studies.

 

Publications

 

"Raising the Bar: Satirizing Law in 21st Century American Literature and Popular Culture"—in process


“The Architecture of Exclusion: Law and Race in Paul Beatty’s The Sellout”—in process.


“Mark Twain and Margaret Garner: Personhood, Property, and Kinship in Puddn’head Wilson”—in process.


“Alternative Systems of Justice in Louise Erdrich’s The Round House”—in process.


“Faulkner’s Future Americans.” Faulkner’s Families, ed. Jay Watson, Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series, University Press of Mississippi (forthcoming).


“When Difference Becomes Dangerous: intersectional identity formation and the protective cover of whiteness in Faulkner’s Light in August.” The Faulkner Journal issue 31.1 (Spring 2019). pp. 43-66.


“Reading Race in Nella Larsen’s Passing and the Rhinelander Case.” African American Review, Volume 46.2 (Summer-Fall 2013). pp. 345-361. Honorable Mention, Weixlmann Prize 2015. 


“The Nature of the Beast: Scientific Theories of Race and Sexuality in McTeague.” Studies in American Naturalism, Volume 4.1 (Summer 2009). pp. 1-21. Winner of the Robert H. Elias Graduate Essay Prize. 

“From ‘Shadowy Anguish’ to ‘The Million Lights of the Sun’: Racial Iconography in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening.” Kate Chopin in the 21st Century: New Critical Essays. Heather Ostman (Editor). Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. pp. 121-136.

 

Awards, Fellowships, and Grants

University of Maine System, Maine Economic Improvement Fund Grant. $500,000. February 2019-February 2021. 
University of Southern Maine, Faculty Chair, Gloria S. Duclos Convocation: “Race and Trauma” ($15,000), 2018-2019
University of Southern Maine, Osher Map Library Teaching With Maps Faculty Fellowship. $1,000. Fall 2019.
Center for Mark Twain Studies, Invited Speaker. Trouble Begins Lecture Series. Awarded. $1,000 May 2018.
University of Southern Maine, President’s Award for Achievement, 2018.
University of Southern Maine, Faculty co-chair, Gloria S. Duclos Convocation: “Race and Participatory Democracy ($70,000), 2017-18.
University of Maine System, Maine Economic Improvement Fund Grant. $500,000. February 2016-February 2019. 
University of Southern Maine, Center for Technology Enhanced Learning, Summer Course Design Grant ($300), July 2017, July 2018, and August 2019. 
University of Southern Maine, Center for Technology Enhanced Learning Course Design Grant. $1,000. January 2017-May 2017. 
University of Southern Maine, Center for Collaboration and Development Grant, Faculty Interest Group Leader. 2015-16 and 2017-18. $2,000. 
Weixlmann Prize, Honorable Mention, African American Review, 2015.
University of Southern Maine, Core Curriculum Service-Learning Mini-Grant, University of Southern Maine, 2015.
University of Southern Maine, Title III Mini-Grant, University of Southern Maine, 2014.
Faulkner Paper Prize, William Faulkner Society, 2013.
Non-Teaching Dissertation Fellowship, UConn English Department, 2013.
Pre-doctoral Fellowship, UConn English Department, 2012.
Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UConn English Department, 2011.
Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UConn Graduate School, 2010.
Aetna Graduate Student Teaching Award, UConn English Department, 2010.

Robert H. Elias Graduate Essay Prize, International Theodore Dreiser Society, 2009.

 

Selected Conference Presentations

 

“Emerging and Dismantling: Feminist Killjoys Confront SSSL’s Past and Present.” The Society for the Study of Southern Literature Biennial Conference. Fayetteville, AR: April 2020.


“Experiences of Emerging Women, Trans, and Non-Binary Scholars in the Academy.” New England Modern Language Association Conference. Boston, MA: March 2020.


“Walking the Honors Tightrope without a Safety Net: Honors Directors Without Tenure.” The National Collegiate Honors Council’s annual Conference. New Orleans, LA: November 2019.


“Thesis Preparation Courses: Designing Robust Interdisciplinary Experiences.” The National Collegiate Honors Council’s annual Conference. New Orleans, LA: November 2019.


“Faulkner’s Future Americans.” The William Faulkner Society’s annual “Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha” Conference. Oxford, MS: July 2019.


“Mark Twain and Margaret Garner: Personhood, Property, and Kinship in Puddn’head Wilson.” American Literature Association Annual Conference. Boston, MA: May 2019.


“The Slave Cabin as Liminal Queer Space.” Southeast American Studies Association Conference. Atlanta, GA: March 2019.


“High Impact Honors: Internship and Study Abroad.” The National Collegiate Honors Council’s annual Conference. Boston, MA: November 2018. 


“Expanding Honors Thesis Project Opportunities within Biology and Allied Health Fields.” The National Collegiate Honors Council’s annual Conference. Boston, MA: November 2018.


“The Slave Cabin as Liminal Space in Faulkner’s Light in August.” The William Faulkner Society’s annual “Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha” Conference.  Oxford, MS: July 2018.


“High Impact Honors: Internship and Study Abroad.” The National Collegiate Honors Council’s annual NCHC Conference. Boston, MA: November 2018. 


“The Slave Cabin as Liminal Space in Faulkner’s Light in August.” The William Faulkner Society’s annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference. Oxford, MS: July 2018.


“The Architecture of Exclusion: Law and Race in Twain and Beatty.” Trouble Begins Lecture Series, Center for Mark Twain Studies. Elmyra, NY: May 2018. 


“Teaching Race in Maine: Exploring the Archives.” Black New England Conference. Durham, NH: October 2017.


“Raising The Bar: Satirizing Law in Puddn’head Wilson and The Sellout.” The American Literature Association Conference. Boston, MA: May 2017. 


“Passing out of Race: Leaving the South in Faulkner and Chesnutt.” The Society for the Study of Southern Literature. Boston, MA: March 2016. 


“Non-Identity, Dis-Identity: Contesting Identities in Modern American Literature.” New England Modern Language Association Conference. Hartford, CT: March 2016. 


“Representing Law in American Literature” (chair). American Literature Association Conference. Boston, MA: May 2015. 


“Modern and Contemporary American Literature in a Global Frame” (chair). American Literature Association Conference. Boston, MA: May 2015.


“Building Writing Support into Advanced Composition Courses: The Honors Thesis Curriculum at the University of Southern Maine.” Engaging Practices: Conference on the Teaching of Composition. Boston, MA: March 2015.


“Alternative Systems of Justice in Louise Erdrich’s The Round House.” NeMLA. Harrisburg, PA: April 2014.


“Law and Legal Figures in Twentieth Century Ethnic American Fiction” (chair). NeMLA. Harrisburg, PA: April 2014. 


“Becoming a Lawyer: Exploring Race and Identity in Light in August and Absalom, Absalom!” Southern Writers, Southern Writing Conference. Oxford, MS: July 2013. Winner of the Faulkner Paper Prize, 2013.


“Deconstructing the Color Line in The Quarry.” American Literature Association. Boston, MA: May 2011. 


“Race and Marriage in Charles Chesnutt’s Paul Marchand.” Multi-Ethnic Literature in the United States (MELUS). Boca Raton, FL: April 2011.


“Building Service Engagement into a Learning Community.” The University of Connecticut Learning Communities Institute. Storrs, CT: May 2010.


“Reading Race in Nella Larsen’s Passing and the Rhinelander Case.” Multi-Ethnic Literature in the United States (MELUS). Scranton, PA: April 2010. 


“Localizing Academic Discourse: Students’ Experiences as Critical Texts in Service Learning Courses.” The University of Connecticut’s Professional Development Workshop. Storrs, CT: March 2010.


“Service Learning in the Freshman English Classroom.” Center for the Improvement of Teaching. University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA: January 2010.


“The Nature of the Beast: Reading Race in McTeague’s Death Valley.” American Literature Association. Boston, MA: May 2009. 

 

“Curriculum Development: Utilizing Students’ Personal Experience in the Writing Classroom.” Conference on the Teaching of Writing. University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT: March 2008.

 

Academic Service

Interim Faculty Chair, Intercultural and Diversity Advisory Council to the President, University of Southern Maine, 2020. 

Committee Member, Diversity Committee, National Collegiate Honors Council, 2018-2022.
Faculty Chair, Gloria S. Duclos Convocation, University of Southern Maine, 2018-2019.
Faculty Chair, University of Southern Maine Thinking Matters: Student Research, Scholarship, and Creativity Symposium. 2014-2019.
Member, Writing Center Visioning Committee, 2019.
Annual Guest Lecturer, “How to Start a Research Project,” School of Music Capstone course (Parchman) 2015-2019.
Annual Guest Judge, “Devils, Dwarves, and Dragons” Ethical Debate (Parchman), 2015-2018.
Guest Lecturer, “Integrating Convocation into the Coloring Book Project,” Art Department Digital Design course (Piribeck), 2019.
Faculty Leader, “Let’s Talk About It,” Maine Humanities Council, Race and Family, (Topsham Public Library). 2018-2019.
Faculty Co-Chair, Gloria S. Duclos Convocation, University of Southern Maine, 2017-18.
Council Member, Food Studies Faculty Council, University of Southern Maine, 2017-18.
Creator, “Let’s Talk About It” Book Group Reading List (theme: Race and Family) 2017-18.
Facilitator, “Lit and Ed” Book Group for Work Program, Maine Humanities Council, 2017-18.
Facilitator, “Escape to Cuba,” Let’s Talk About It Book Group, Maine Humanities Council, 2017.
Faculty Chair, Thinking Matters Research Symposium, University of Southern Maine, 2015-current.
Executive Committee Member, Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Society, 2015-current.
Leadership Team Member, AAC&U Institute on Integrative Learning and the Departments, 2016.
University of Southern Maine Executive Committee Member, AASC&U Conference, 2015.
Administrator, Honors Leadership Development Scholarship, University of Southern Maine, 2014-current.
Academic Advisor, Honors Program, University of Southern Maine, 2014-current.
Member, First Year Experience Committee, University of Southern Maine, 2014-15.
Group Leader, Freshman English Teaching Practicum, University of Connecticut, 2011-2012.
Chair, Aetna Graduate Student Teaching Award Committee, University of Connecticut, 2011.
Contributing Writer, Graduate Student Teaching Orientation Manual, University of Connecticut, 2011.
Invited Speaker, English Graduate Student Association Professional Development Seminar, University of Connecticut, 2011.
Invited Speaker, Graduate Student Teaching Orientation, University of Connecticut, 2010.
Mentor for First Year Graduate Student, University of Connecticut, 2010-2011.
Chairperson, English Graduate Student Association Diversity Committee, University of Connecticut, 2009-2010.

Teaching Experience


Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, 2018-2019
Lecturer, University of Southern Maine, 2016-2018
Instructor, University of Southern Maine, 2014-2016
Teaching Assistant, University of Connecticut Storrs, 2007- 2014 

 

Selected Course Descriptions:

HON 101: Entry Year Experience, University of Southern Maine 
A three-credit course required for first-year Honors students. Students explore evolving conceptions of “race” in the United States, beginning in the antebellum period and extending into the present day. Course texts are drawn from a variety of disciplines including literature, art, history, law, sociology, and anthropology. The course emphasizes the dynamic power relationships that are engendered and sustained by American legal and cultural and practices, and asks students to chart the conversations about “race” as they emerge in written and visual representations. Special emphasis is given to changing conceptions of “race” in Maine. Experiential activities include a field trip to Malaga Island, a walking tour of the Portland Freedom Trail, a semester-length service-learning project with Portland Housing Authority, etc.      

 

HON 215: Thinking in Honors, University of Southern Maine 
A three-credit course required of all Honors students. This course has 2 major goals: first, to engage students in planning their intellectual path through USM and beyond; second, to gain the necessary skills for success in upper level Honors courses and to develop their own signature works. Students will be introduced to the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge. By the end of the semester, students will be able to critically review literature, understand intellectual property rights, and navigate research participant safety issues. Students will be introduced to a variety of research methods and learn the processes for funding, presenting, and publishing intellectual inquiry. We will explore ethics and values in research and scholarship. In short, this course offers an extended exploration of how we learn what we need know. My hope is that students in this course will develop a supportive group of intellectual peers and to chart an academic path from themselves in the USM Honors Program and beyond.

 

HON 207: Multiethnic Graphic Novels and Memoirs 
A three-credit course elective for Honors students. This course invites students to explore the field of Comics Studies, with a particular focus on the graphic novel. We will consider texts from a variety of genres (including memoir, fiction, fantasy, journalism), perspectives, and contexts. In particular, we will consider how graphic and sequential artists use the form to bring marginal voices to the center, and we will consider what particular aspects of sequential art lend themselves to marginalized individuals and stories. Students will have opportunities to learn theories and approaches in Comics Studies, and to create graphic and sequential art of their own.

 

HON 410: Thesis Workshop I, University of Southern Maine 
A three-credit course for advanced Honors students. The Honors Thesis course sequence at USM provides students with the opportunity to undertake and complete an independent research project. Students investigate the thesis subject thoroughly, write and revise a formal research statement, conduct a review of the appropriate literature, choose a thesis advisor and committee, embark on a research program, and produce a formal thesis prospectus.  

 

HON 311: Honors Internship
The purpose of the Honors internship is to provide students with the opportunity to advance and refine their skills in the disciplines as well as develop essential skills, refine technical and transferable competencies during employment with a business, industry, or community partner. I liaise with community partners to secure appropriate internships with students (e.g. New England Ocean Cluster, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Martin’s Point, Idexx, Wex, Goodwill Northern New England, etc.). The internship course is structured around self-directed learning experiences that allow each student to transfer academic knowledge and skills into competencies required for successful careers. Each student is expected to take control of the learning experience and manage the learning process. The self-directed experience develops critical management abilities such as decision-making, time management, and self-reflection/metacognition, in addition to developing technical job-related competencies.  

 

HON 331: Independent Study, University of Southern Maine 
This optional course allows an Honors student with interests in a particular subject area to research that area under the direction of a faculty supervisor. The research may be carried out in any subject area. I have advised students studying the writings of Charles Sanders Peirce, Multiethnic American Women Writers, Death and Dying in Hospice Care (with an extensive service-learning component), and Multiethnic Graphic American Novels and Memoirs. 

 

HON 415: Honors Capstone, University of Southern Maine 
A one-credit course that asks students to identify and reflect upon their own interests, skills, values, and learning styles and to articulate how these relate to their future career and education goals. The course will explore and evaluate potential careers through research, informational interviews, networking activities and more. Students will end the course having completed three job or graduate school applications to organizations of interest and begin the process of identifying a career plan to help students fulfill their life ambitions. This Capstone course is focused on higher-level educational outcomes: application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. There is also a strong emphasis on metacognition: I encourage students to reflect upon their thinking, learning, and development during their time at USM and in Honors. In tandem with this reflective practice, students will be guided through a formal job search: writing formal Resumes and Cover Letters, creating job-specific content (elevator pitches), and learning essential skills. The course includes workshops on networking, interviewing, etc. 

 

ENG 385/WGS 345: Late 19th Century American Literature: Race and Gender at Century’s End, University of Southern Maine 
A three-credit course designed for English and Women and Gender Studies majors. The course explores how issues of race and gender, both before the Civil War and especially in the aftermath of slavery, were constructed and understood in America as the nineteenth century drew to a close. Students read primary texts of literary and historical importance that are concerned with racial and gender stereotyping, responses to stereotyping by white and African-American authors and public intellectuals, and definitions of gender and race as identity categories. We set the texts and the themes that are central to these texts in a larger cultural and historical context.

 

ENGL 3214W: Black American Writers, Writing Intensive Seminar, University of Connecticut
A three-credit writing-intensive course for advanced undergraduate students, which charts the development of African American literary form and discourse in the first half of the twentieth century. Authors included Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Charles W. Chesnutt, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, and Ralph Ellison. The course considered themes such as individual identity and the assertion of humanity, freedom and literacy, citizenship and voting rights, prejudice and segregation. The course fulfills the “Writing” requirement for General Education at the University of Connecticut. 

 

ENGL 1011: Seminar in Academic Writing through Literary Texts, Community Service Learning Community, University of Connecticut 
A four-credit required composition course for freshmen with a significant service-learning component: students commit to semester-long work at a service site for four hours per week, and each writing project asks students to put their service experiences into conversation with course texts. The course focus was memoir, and authors included Richard Rodriguez, John Edgar Wideman, James Baldwin, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Zora Neale Hurston. 

 

EPSY 3098: Community Service Learning Community, University of Connecticut
A yearlong interdisciplinary social justice-themed course designed for sophomores and juniors. The first semester considers the ethics of service and encourages students to reflect on their roles in their outreach work and their learning community. The second semester considers the issues attendant to global citizenship and asks students to put their community-based learning into action by organizing a campus-wide service event. Throughout the academic year, this course takes on issues of social justice and social inequality, and seeks to equip students with the tools to become active agents for positive social change. Authors include Keith Morton, Anne E. Green, Wendell Berry, Robert Coles, and Ann Beaufort. 

 

Professional Experience

Director, Honors Program, University of Southern Maine, 2015-current
I oversee all Honors Program operations, including curriculum development, faculty review, student learning assessment, program review, student recruitment and retention. I am P.I. on a Maine Economic Improvement Fund grant that supports the Honors Comprehensive Study Abroad Program, which I oversee. I serve as Lead Academic Advisor for Honors students and coordinate advising of Honors students with faculty and professional staff advisors. I manage the Honors Living and Learning Community and serve on a variety of committees aimed at expanding the Learning Communities program at USM. I direct the Honors Leadership Development Scholarship. As an Honors faculty member, I design and teach interdisciplinary and writing-intensive seminars for the Program. 

 

Faculty Co-Chair, Gloria S. Duclos Convocation, University of Southern Maine, 2017-2019
In collaboration with a faculty co-chair, I have articulated the themes “Race and Participatory Democracy” and “Race and Trauma” for USM’s Convocation, a year-long commitment to exploring the ways that race and democracy are inextricably interconnected in the U.S. and in Maine, specifically. Convocation is intended to reach a broad audience: we are working to engage our university and also the greater Maine community. Convocation is a celebration of community learning. Our roster of events and activities includes large public lectures, structured panel discussions, a film series, book discussion groups, a political art poster contest, and a large outdoor spring concert. We have built partnerships to support these events: our collaborators include the University of Maine School of Law, the SPACE Gallery, the Portland Museum of Art, the Center for Collaboration and Development, the Maine Humanities Council, Maine College of Art, the Civil Rights Team Project, etc.

 

Faculty Chair, Thinking Matters Student Research Symposium, University of Southern Maine, 2015-2019
My primary duties as the Thinking Matters Faculty Chair is to serve as liaison with USM faculty, staff, students, administration and the greater Portland community to make Thinking Matters (TM) an outstanding event. I chair an interdisciplinary faculty board that reviews student abstract submissions in collaboration with USM’s Internal Review Board. As Faculty Chair, I am responsible for educating and engaging faculty at USM, and I have also built relationships with Southern Maine Community College, Kennebec Valley Community College, and Central Maine Community College so that these students and faculty also have a venue where they can showcase their work. I partner with the Marketing and Advancement teams to engage the community in supporting and attending this event. In collaboration with the USM Libraries, I mentor students presenting at the symposium.

 

Member, Writing Center Visioning Committee 
As part of a broader conversation of supporting student writing across the curriculum at USM, the committee is charged with exploring the potential for an enhanced, more visible writing support service. One outcome of the committee work is a proposal to be submitted to the Provost. The proposal will outline recommendations for the scope of service, budgetary needs, effective staffing models, and appropriate space allocation.

 

Council Member, Food Studies Faculty Council, University of Southern Maine, 2017-2018
I am an inaugural member of the Food Studies Program’s Faculty Council, and also serve on the recruitment subcommittee. Much like the Honors Program, the Food Studies Faculty Council is a governing body that oversees curriculum development, faculty review, assessment of student learning, etc. 

 

Community Service Learning Community Graduate Assistant, University of Connecticut, 2013-2014
I was responsible for organizing and implementing all curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular activities for the Community Service Learning Community. My responsibilities included designing and teaching curricula for two courses on civic engagement, social justice and service; planning and implementing co- and extra-curricular activities (e.g. coordinating visiting speakers, service opportunities, field trips etc.), and serving as both advisor and mentor to students. 

 

Lead Graduate Assistant Coordinator for the Learning Communities Initiative, University of Connecticut, 2010-2011 
I supported the implementation of the Davis Education Foundation Grant in Freshman English and First-Year Programs. I guided instructors to develop discipline- and interest-based writing courses and developed co- and extra-curricular connections among the different learning communities (e.g. Public Health, Animal Sciences, Community Outreach, Engineering, Pre-Pharmacy, Leadership, and Chemistry). 

 

Learning Communities Freshman Writing Assessment Lead Coordinator, University of Connecticut, 2010-2011
I designed and ran an assessment of student writing that enabled a comparison between student writing in general Freshman English courses and Learning-Community-specific courses. I also co- authored a report for the Davis Education Foundation that summarized our work and charted a plan for subsequent years of implementation. 

 

Freshman English Program Writing Assessment Reader and Reviewer, University of Connecticut, Summer 2009
This direct assessment project targeted student writing in required Freshman English courses. I worked on a team of graduate student and faculty readers to perform the assessment and write a comprehensive report that represents and analyzes that process, summarizes results, advances a few chief arguments about these results, and offers recommendations to the university’s General Education Executive Committee, the Freshmen English program, and instructors for these courses. 

 

Writing Center Coordinator, University of Connecticut Greater Hartford, Summer 2008
The Writing Center offers individualized tutorial sessions designed to support students at every stage of the writing process. Coordinator tasks include scheduling, documentation, tutoring, and promoting the Writing Center to instructors and students. 

 

Thesis Advising

Katie Prior, “Rewilding: Our spiritual relationship with nature, traced throughout the literary tradition.” Primary Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Nisetich. 


Griffin Germond, “Checking In, Concussions Out: Body Checking in Maine Girls' High School Ice Hockey & Beyond.” UROP recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Dennis Gilbert.


Emma Quinn, “Myth, Metaphor, and Memorialization: A History of the Spanish Civil War through Pablo Picasso’s Guernica and Robert Capa’s photography.” UROP recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Libby Bischof.


Haley Depner, “The chemical properties of soil in the vicinity of two genera of ant belonging to the subfamily Myrmicinae, Aphaenogaster, and Myrmica.” UROP Recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Joe Staples.


Madeleine Sherrill, “Impulsivity and Cardiovascular Reactivity: Examining Correlations Between Impulsivity as Measured by Self Report, Delay Discounting, and Response Inhibition and Cardiovascular Response to Stress.” UROP recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Liz Vella. 


Margo Arruda, “Does This Unit Have a Soul?” A Roboethical Examination of Concepts of Personhood and Synthetic Life in the Mass Effect Trilogy. UROP recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Ben Bertram. 


Bryer Sousa, “Methods of Optimization in Data Science and Data Mining: A Comprehensive Review.” UROP recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Muhammad El Taha.


Jazmyn Sylvester-Cross, “Long-distance Wh-movement in Germanic Languages: AN Account Based on Case-making and Language Production Pressures.” UROP recipient. Primary Faculty Advisor: Dana McDaniel.


Jacob LiBrizzi, “The Haunted Animal: Peirce’s Community of Inquiry and the Foundation of the Self.” Primary Faculty Advisor: Jason Read.

Sergey Miller, “Pastoral Reverences and Remembrances: Poetic Measuring of Nature.” Primary Faculty Advisor: Ben Bertram. 


Professional Affiliations

 

Modern Language Association
American Studies Association
American Literature Association
American Humor Studies Association
William Faulkner Society, Secretary
National Collegiate Honors Council, Diversity Committee 
Maine Humanities Council
Mark Twain Circle
Charles W. Chesnutt Society

 

References

 

Liz Vella, Professor of Psychology, Chair of Psychology Department, University of Southern Maine.
    Phone (office): (207) 780-4252
    Email: Elizabeth.Vella@maine.edu 

 

Ben Bertram, Professor of English, University of Southern Maine. 
    Phone (office): (207) 780-4944 
    Email: Bertram@maine.edu 

 

Clare Eby, Professor of English, University of Connecticut
     Phone (office): 860-486-2683 
     Email: clareeby@earthlink.net  

A current version of my CV is available for download here